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Men's Skin Care, Men's Grooming, Acne Treatments & Nutrition Supplements Blog

 

Thursday, October 08, 2009

Can You Get Fit & Burn Fat By Eating Certain Foods?

In case you missed out on our last 'Special Delivery' about Foods That Can Get You Fit and Fuel Your Workouts, below is a link to it:

http://www.menscience.com/Foods-That-Can-Get-You-Fit-and-Fuel-Your-Workouts_ep_252.html

We all know that food and water serve as the body’s fuel. Some foods however help your body burn more calories, give you a boost of energy and keep you full longer for maximum workout efficiency. Whether you’re looking to get in shape, stay in shape or to be healthy and look good, these tips will help you get there faster...more »

If you want to receive articles and tips like this one, make sure you sign-up to our newsletter.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Why you should take Omega 3 Fatty Acids

OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS are considered essential fatty acids. They are essential to human health but are not naturally present in the body and must be obtained from food such as certain types of fish and leafy vegetables or from nutritional supplements. If you are like most Americans, you are probably not getting enough omega-3 fatty acids.

Two of the most beneficial Omega 3 Fatty Acids that are easily absorbed and utilized by the body are Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA). Numerous clinical studies have suggested that EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may be helpful in treating a variety of health conditions. The evidence is strongest for heart disease and problems that contribute to heart disease, but the list of possible benefits of taking omega-3 fatty acids is long.

Continue reading...

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Monday, May 19, 2008

Fabulous Fish Fat

OMEGA-3's are called 'essential fatty acids,' essential to men because the body can't manufacture them, so they must be derived from one's diet. Unfortunately, many men aren't getting adequate amounts.
What are they? According to the Mayo Clinic, omega-3 fatty acids comprise numerous polyunsaturated fatty acids, but the a-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) are the most important.

What do they do? Large population clinical studies have proven that DHA and EPA reduce the risk of death, heart attack, abnormal heart rhythms (known as arrhythmia), and stroke - especially amongst persons with a history of cardiovascular disease. Omega-3 fatty acids have also been found to lower cholesterol, blood pressure and slow artery hardening. Research has also shown that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for depression and anxiety, diabetes, asthma, poor learning and focus in children, rheumatoid arthritis, certain cancers, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

Where do they come from? Where ALA is mostly found in plant and nut oils, such as flaxseed oil, canola oil and walnuts and pumpkin seeds, the most readily available sources of EPA and DHA are cold-water fish like salmon, mackerel, anchovies, halibut, sardines and tuna.

How much is needed? For healthy men with no history of heart disease, the American Heart Association recommends eating a variety of fatty fish at least twice a week and including oils and other ALA rich foods in men's diets where possible. Many foods offer omega-3 supplementation, but the amounts are often negligible and are highly variable. To ensure men are getting adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, doctors highly recommend omega-3 supplementation, especially for those men with high cholesterol.


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Monday, May 12, 2008

Salt Seasoning Surplus or Shortness?

In the May issue of Men's Journal, there was an interesting editorial on salt seasoning. Citing a recent study from the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the article explained that although a reduction in sodium would be good for the vast majority of the population (saving upwards of 150,000 lives a year), salt cutbacks could be a bad thing for a small minority.

A special segment of the population, namely high endurance athletes, may not be getting enough salt. Men training for marathons, going on lengthy bike rides or competing in triathlons are at risk of salt deficiency. Sodium is needed because it keeps athletes hydrated, enabling the body to absorb fluids faster. On average, a marathoner will lose about 700 to 1,600 milligrams of sodium an hour.

To be sure you're getting adequate amounts of sodium in the summer heat, drink a 20 ounce bottle of a sport drink for each hour after intensive exercise and another immediately after to replenish lost fluids. To perform at optimal levels, athletic men should also be sure that their nutritional needs are cared for and that they're taking adequate sun care precautions to protect their skin from sun damage.
For other articles on men's grooming and skincare and sports, read Solving Sports Related Skin Problems.

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Friday, January 11, 2008

A Choice of Obesity

At MenScience, we're constantly reading up on new health topics and claims to get the most information on men's grooming, men's skincare and men's health. And the men's topic we come across again and again is obesity.

But whether you think it's a disease or a condition--one of the biggest health risks for men or completely blown out of proportion, there's a new voice in the obesity argument. A new book, The Fattening of America: How the Economy Makes us Fat, If It Matters, and What to Do About It, claims that more and more Americans are becoming obese as a lifestyle choice. Due to the dwindling emphasis on physical labor in our society, and better treatments and medications for obesity, the author Eric Finklestein makes the point that more and more Americans choose to live a lifestyle that promotes obesity.

This eyebrow-raising claim has been causing controversy among medical professionals and those who are obese alike, but as reported in an article at Yahoo News, "Finkelstein says he wrote "The Fattening of America" to "encourage discussion of what I understand is probably an uncomfortable position for a lot of people."

We're firm believers in the gospel of regular fitness, balanced nutrition and a healthy lifestyle, but this leaves even us scratching our heads. Is obesity a disease? Or a conscious choice men make? What do you think?

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Wednesday, November 07, 2007

The Dangers of Bacteria to Men's Health


There's been a lot of talk lately about the threat of bacteria to men's bodies and with good cause: more and more cases of bacteria-related deaths, such as those caused by staph infections and MRSA bacteria, are surfacing every day. To make matters even tricker, some strains of bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics due to overuse and over-prescription.

So how to stay healthy? Simple: keep your skin clean, wounds covered and your hands to yourself!

1. Wash your body regularly with an antibacterial body wash. This will immediately kill bacteria you accumulate through the day or after working out.

2. Wash hands frequently using hot water and an antibacterial cleanser, especially before meals. Be sure to wash them for at least 15 seconds and rub them vigorously to make sure all containments are rinsed away.

3. Using an antibacterial gel can also cut down on bacteria for times when you can't get to a sink, but keep in mind they should not be relied on for regular cleansing.

4. Completely cover all cuts, sores, scrapes and open wounds with clean bandages.

5. When working out at a gym, be sure to wipe down all equipment with a clean towel before use, even if it does not appear to be sweaty.

6. Don't share towels, razors or any other items which come in direct contact with skin.

7. Reduce the spread of bacteria by washing workout clothes and towels with hot water as soon as possible after use, and drying them completely. Never reuse socks, clothes or towels from a previous day's workout.

8. Boost your immune system by taking a nutritional supplement that contains antioxidants such as Vitamin C. This will help improve your chances of warding off a possible infection.

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Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Give MenScience Your Opinion and Win an Advanced Shave Kit

If you've visited the MenScience company website, you know that we're constantly researching new areas of men's health every day to provide effective products and information. And while a lot of that is done in labs and clinical environments by health professionals, we're also gathering information from all sorts of men in more informal ways....like through our monthly MenScience contest.

Every month, we reveal a new set of questions focusing on a specific aspect of men's skincare, grooming, nutrition or health, and we always get an overwhelming response. We use these results in a variety of ways: everything from providing you with interesting statistics, to creating monthly newsletters, to choosing what types of products to release next. And every month, we choose one lucky winner to receive a free Advanced Shave Kit!

It's a win-win situation. Check out this month's contest at www.menscience.com for your chance to provide us with opinions on what guys really want...and win a sweet prize!

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Thursday, October 11, 2007

New Book Raises Controversy About The Way We Think of Diet and Nutrition

If you've ever browsed the health aisle of a bookstore, you have a pretty good idea of the huge amount of information available covering almost every facet of health, eating and nutrition. More and more of these books are published everyday, pushing new ideas about nutrition to the forefront, and causing yesterday's advice to fade into the background.

With all this "nutritional help" available, why are men still dealing with a growing weight problem?

Gary Taubes proposes to shed a different light on the answer in his new book, Good Calories, Bad Calories. Although the book has caused plenty of eyebrows to lift by heaping even more blame on carbs for increased weight problems and revealing that the "obesity" crisis actually comes down to a small increase of body mass index, Taubes's main point seems to be that our ideas of nutrition and weight gain are based on scientific information that has not been thoroughly tested or proven, and has simply been accepted by us as "fact."

Taubes is getting plenty of heat for his strong views (some say he tends to omit contradictory health studies of the past), and he's gained plenty of attention for this new approach to nutrition (he's been featured in Men's Journal, ABC News, and the New York Times last month alone).

But what do you think about Taubes's concept? Is there anything wrong with re-thinking the facts of nutrition? Or is it just another book to add to the growing mountain of literature offering yet another "health fix" for the average man?

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Friday, October 05, 2007

Get Fit By Eating Well

Staying fit and losing some pounds can be a daunting task for men. Because of this, MenScience has prepared a set of no-nonsense tips that will have you looking good and feeling great.

1. Try eating several small meals throughout the day. This controls appetite and keeps your metabolism going.

2. Don't starve and then binge. Skipping meals could end up promoting more fat storage and lowering your metabolism due to fluctuating insulin and blood sugar levels.

3. Set regular mealtimes and stick with them. Once your body comes to expect a meal at the same time everyday, it's easier to avoid sudden cravings and snack attacks.

4. When hunger strikes, make sure you've got some healthy snack options available to you (this is a great way to get in your 5-9 servings a day of fruits and vegetables).

5. Protein is more filling than simple carbohydrates and has fewer calories, so be sure to include fish, lean beef and pork, white-meat poultry, eggs, nuts and beans in your diet.

6. Reduce serving sizes and eat a wider variety of food. Don't deny yourself your favorite foods...just consume them in moderation.

7. Avoid drinks that contain calories and stick to water instead. Many men don't realize that beverages are often loaded with empty calories and don't accommodate for them with their meals.

8. One simple way to avoid packing on calories is to use more spices in your food and less condiments like mayonnaise, butter and sour cream.

9. Eat slowly so your body gets a chance to register the food and you won't end up eating more than you should. Eat until you feel satisfied; not stuffed.

Check out more tips on weight management in the Tips & Advice section on www.menscience.com.

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Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Dollars for Donuts

You think putting on some weight is embarrassing? What if an entire town was watching you? In a move which could backfire magnificently or vastly improve the health of its citizens, an Italian town will pay overweight and obese men who live there to lose weight.

According to Reuters: Men living in the northwestern Italian town of Varallo will receive 50 euros ($70) for losing 4 kg (9 pounds) in a month, Mayor Gianluca Buonanno said. Women will get the same amount for shedding 3 kg (7 pounds).


Will Italian residents lose the pounds? And more importantly, would America be wading through an obesity crisis if we were getting paid to work the fat off? Hmmm.....


DG

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Thursday, August 16, 2007

Men of MenScience: David Miller

David Miller doesn't know the meaning of the words "couch potato." He's a fitness trainer who's achieved an incredible level of success as the founder of D.A.M. Good Bodies Elite Personal Training.

Maintaining a diverse roster of clients that includes athletes, entertainers, models and professionals, David has devoted his life to helping people become the healthiest and fittest they can be. "Training is so much more involved then most people realize. I've worked with a wide range of clients from athletes that want to take it to the next level, to people who have not regularly exercised since they were in high school," he states.

David began his life-long love of fitness with a very active childhood, and pursued athletics throughout school and into college where he received a B.S. in Exercise & Sport Science from Penn State University. As a football player there, David understood what it took to get athletes into shape. He used this knowledge to help train athletes at Penn State and Temple University, and later on as Physical Director & Coordinator of Personal Training and Fitness Testing at the Central Branch YMCA. After gaining these years of experience, David officially launched D.A.M. Good Bodies Elite Personal Training in Philadelphia in 1992. He later relocated his company to Hollywood, Florida, but still maintains strong ties with his hometown.

At D.A.M. Good Bodies, David customizes specific programs that incorporate cardio, resistance training, flexibility and nutrition guidance for a variety of clients. He says, "I'm constantly giving information to clients. I don't want them to do something just because I say they should; I want them to understand why they should do it."

The 41-year-old athlete has built a solid career on discovering what it takes to get the human body in top form and this hasn't gone unrecognized: David was named Best Personal Trainer in his hometown of Philadelphia by Heart & Soul Magazine and has been featured in Health Quest magazine, the Philadelphia Inquirer, on the cover of ESPN Magazine, and on numerous radio programs. He is currently certified by the National Strength & Conditioning Association and American Council on Exercise, and is a member of the International Association of Fitness Professionals.

He says, "I've been doing this for 20 years, and I'm still always learning, I'm always discovering new information and research. You have to try and educate yourself."

While still creating and implementing customized, effective physical training programs at D.A.M. Good Bodies, David has also recently become concerned about the growing trend of childhood obesity and would like to become involved in eliminating this problem.

It is because of David's firm commitment to improving the health of Americans one person at a time that MenScience recognizes him as a true Man of MenScience.

For more information about David and his training programs, as well as free fitness and nutrition advice, visit his website at www.damgoodbodies.com.

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Thursday, July 19, 2007

The Case Against Liquid Lunches

Everyone knows your body needs hydration for optimal performance, especially during sweaty, summer months. But a new study might have you reassessing how much beverage you should actually drink.

According to a study performed at Purdue University in Indiana, subjects who "drank" a controlled lunch of specially-prepared liquid test foods ended up consuming more calories than those that ate a solid food-and-water meal. The study concluded:

All three groups consumed the most total calories on days when a meal supplement was liquid (be it milk, watermelon juice or coconut milk), consuming 12 percent to 20 percent more calories than on solid-food days. Professor Wayne Campbell says that prior studies have measured feelings of hunger but it has been "a leap of faith to believe that feelings of hunger correspond to the amount of calories consumed." This experiment stands out, he says, because calorie intake was directly measured---revealing that people drinking liquid foods later consumed more calories even though they had reported feeling just as full.

More calories are absorbed through beverage-drinking because the body does not recognize beverages as an actual food source. After all, "people may get up to to 50 percent of their calories from beverages -- but for most of human history, the only beverage was water. The idea that liquids contain nutrients, Campbell says, is one our bodies aren't yet aware of."

And you thought that double-chocolate milkshake was the only danger to your health.


DG

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Friday, July 06, 2007

The Ins and Outs of Vitamins

More and more men are turning to vitamins and supplements to help them have more energy, feel good and maintain a healthy lifestyle. But sometimes it's easy to get lost in the virtual sea of ingredients available in the supplement aisle of health & wellness stores.

To shed some much-needed light on the benefits of different types of ingredients, as well as the dangers of taking too many different kinds of supplements or taking too much, The Houston Chronicle recently ran an article, The ABCs of Vitamins, that provides a pretty informative guide to supplementation.

For even more information about the correct usage of supplements, see the MenScience articles How to Include a Supplement in Your Diet and The MenScience Nutritional Philosophy.

So are vitamins and supplements necessary for a healthy lifestyle? What supplements are you taking right now? Is there a real danger in taking too many?

DG



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